History of Rural Youth Europe


Did you know that…

Rural Youth Europe was founded as a European Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO) in Rendsburg, Germany in 1957. It was formerly named “European Committee for Young Farmers and 4H Clubs”. The current name, Rural Youth Europe, was adopted in 2004.

The first steps of the organisation were taken after the Second World War, when leading persons of British, Scandinavian and Central European rural organisations wanted to establish their vision of a pan-European network. Later on, Southern and Eastern European members joined to develop the organisation.

Today, 20 member organisations from 18 countries and more than 500,000 young people are part of Rural Youth Europe.

The main idea of Rural Youth Europe was to bring together the traditional out-of-school organisations of Western and Central Europe and the in-school organisations of Scandinavia. Leadership trainings, courses, seminars, exchanges and other practical activities were organised in order to encourage this idea. These activities received funding from local sponsors and then later from the Council of Europe and the European Commission.

Today the three main activities of Rural Youth Europe are the Spring Seminar, the Autumn Seminar and the European Rally. Especially the European Rally has a long history and it is a fundamental part of RYEurope’s activities. The first Rally was held in 1960 in Zuidlaren, Netherlands. Over the years the European Rally has become a major event on the calendars of all member organisations.

European Rallies from 1960 until today

  • 2015 – Lambach, Austria, Work hand in hand – Create your land
  • 2014 – Port Talbot, Wales, Tomorrows World – Creating a sustainable future for you, your organisation and your rural community
  • 2013 – Tipperary, Ireland, Get Involved, Get Involved – Be the Change: Mobilising Rural Communities to Active Citizenship
  • 2012 – Żerków, Poland, Reach Your Potential! Developing Youth Leadership in Rural Communities
  • 2011 – Ruše, Slovenia, Be active – get better opportunities in life!
  • 2010 – Halmstad, Sweden, DIY in the countryside: think global, act local, be vocal!
  • 2009 – Jäneda, Estonia, Beware – Active Youth!
  • 2008 – Landquart, Switzerland, Nature and technology – the challenge for youth in Europe to find the balance
  • 2007 – Bad Sassendorf, Germany, Future under construction – Youth at work in Europe
  • 2006 – Druva, Latvia, Pearls in Contrast – Multicultural Aspects of Rural Youth
  • 2005 – Perth, Scotland, Expanding Horizons: One Europe – Many Cultures
  • 2004 – Antrim, Northern Ireland, Conquering Conflict Across Cultural Divides
  • 2003 – Flekke, Norway, Ocean of Opportunities. Coastal, cultural and social value
  • 2002 – Salzburg, Austria, Water – Source of life
  • 2001 – Nurmes, Finland, Nature – Source of creativity
  • 2000 – Llanfairpwll, Wales, Back to the future
  • 1999 – Warsaw, Poland, Youth unites Europe – chances, opportunities, perspectives
  • 1998 – Horsens, Denmark, Give and take from your youth organisation in Europe
  • 1997 – Triesdorf, Germany, Keeping Diversity – Forming Europe
  • 1996 – Zollikofen, Switzerland, Limits-Encounters
  • 1995 – Edinburgh, Scotland, Qualities of Life
  • 1994 – Drogheda, Ireland, Emigration and Migration
  • 1993 – Melsom, Norway, Rural development and cultural identity
  • 1992 – De Glind Netherlands Europe, It’s just a beginning
  • 1991 – Edelhof, Austria, Protecting Environment and nature it to protect ourselves
  • 1990 – Gothenburg, Sweden, Nature and Human Being
  • 1989 – Greenmount, Antrim, Northern Ireland, A Celebration Of Rural Skills and Traditions
  • 1988 – Hampshire, England
  • 1987 – Turku, Finland, Learning and Earning trough Nature
  • 1986 – Quern, Schleswig Holstein, Germany, Women and Girls in Society: Yesterday- Today- Tomorrow
  • 1985 – Aberystwyth, Wales
  • 1984 – Termonfecking, Co. Louth, Ireland, Self Help
  • 1983 – Horsens, Denmark, Local Community Prospects- Young Peoples Function in Rural Districts
  • 1982 – Barau, Bern, Switzerland, Nutrition and conservation of nations food supplies
  • 1981 – Scotland
  • 1980 – Netherlands
  • 1979 – Greenmount, Ulster, Northern Ireland
  • 1978 – Satila, Sweden
  • 1977 – Trento, Italy
  • 1976 – Santiago de Compostela, Spain
  • 1975 – Amot, Norway
  • 1974 – Maidenhead, England
  • 1973 – Germany
  • 1972 – Odense, Denmark
  • 1971 – Münsingen, Switzerland
  • 1970 – Päivölä/Sääksmäki, Finland
  • 1969 – Wien/Klagenfurt, Austria
  • 1968 – Gormonston, Ireland
  • 1967 – Bergamo, Italy
  • 1966 – Edinburgh, Scotland
  • 1965 – Barmeveld, Netherlands
  • 1964 – Aberystwyth, Wales
  • 1963 – Rendsburg, Germany
  • 1962 – Vestfold, Norway
  • 1961 – Ulster, Northern Ireland
  • 1960 – Zuidlaren, Netherlands, 1st Rally